35TE - how many are flybridge?

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tconnelly254
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Hi all,

Does anyone have any knowledge of the 35TE models from the early 2000s. Is there any way to find out how many of these were flybridge models?

I have one (2002) and I have seen very, very few of them.

Mostly, this is just for curiosity, but I also want to know how many of those with flybridge, came with hardtops on the flybridge.
Halcyon
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Our 2003 has a flying bridge , the fishing layout. I have never seen production numbers but don’t think they made very many.

Never seen a flying bridge with a hardtop on a 35 TE. I would worry about weight up that high and wind age.
tconnelly254
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Thanks for the reply. Mine has a hardtop on the flybridge (along with full enclosure) and I'm trying to collect info to determine whether or not I should keep that setup.

It probably sounds crazy to even consider "downgrading" the hardtop to a canvas top. The primary reason I'd be doing so is because I believe the boat to be a little top heavy.

Photo attached here (can find more later).
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Jkraft
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tconnelly254 wrote: Mon Feb 08, 2021 9:20 am Thanks for the reply. Mine has a hardtop on the flybridge (along with full enclosure) and I'm trying to collect info to determine whether or not I should keep that setup.

It probably sounds crazy to even consider "downgrading" the hardtop to a canvas top. The primary reason I'd be doing so is because I believe the boat to be a little top heavy.

Photo attached here (can find more later).
If it were mine I would be leaving it as is. Hard to beat a hard top. I cant help but wonder just how much that top is affecting it
2002 28 TE with 315 Yanmar “Hair Of The Dog”
tconnelly254
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It's pretty thick and probably pretty heavy (my guess is about 250 lbs for the top itself, plus 100 lbs or so total in aluminum tubing, plus all the curtains ... which is equivalent to having an additional 2 people at a very high center of gravity up there).

I was thinking of opening up the flybridge anyway. And as somebody else mentioned above, I think it was pretty rare for this model to have a hardtop. So I think this was added after market. In my one season of using this boat, I feel like it does affect stability.

Anybody else have similar experiences, with Albins or other flybridge boats with after market hardtops on the FB?
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rcwhite
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Ours has a hard top, pretty sure Doug has one as well.

I considered removing it for a bit but it does have advantages. In the northeast during the summer we would prefer the open flybridge. In the off season on the other hand the enclosure is (reasonably) comfortable with a 1500 watt heater at 30 degrees or until the sun comes up. South of New England it is nice to have the additional sun protection the hard top provides.

I am sure the extra weight does impact overall performance and handling but we have put plenty of time/miles on the boat both inshore and offshore and are comfortable with the compromise given how we use the boat.
tconnelly254
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Thanks rcwhite...I agree that the hard top is an asset, especially in terms of comfort. If I were to remove it, I would have a canvas top fabricated to replace it, on the same aluminum frame. So no loss of sun protection. I would also consider adding vinyl windows on the front as well as halfway or maybe 1/3 of the way, around each lateral side.

But the weight ... I think it's making her a little top heavy. I'm likely going to get a naval architect's opinion this spring when I remove the shrink wrap.

It's only been one season for me (and this is my first boat with a flybridge), but I am having a hard time adjusting to the feeling of the big roll/yaw during a following sea.

Are any of you guys with the flybridge model of the 35TE open to offering some advice on handling this boat in those conditions? I've gotten the standard advice (adjust speed, remove trim, lots of rudder and throttle management), and have taken that advice in practice a few times, but I could use some advice from people who have had this model boat for more than a few years.
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catalina_mike
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Contact you local Coast Guard Reserve and see if they can do a stability test for you. That will make you feel better but will create a record of things.
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rcwhite
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I am going to make a guess the conditions that you find uncomfortable are quartering rather than following. At least in our experience this is where the 35 requires the most attention to stay on track and is the most sensitive to tabs.
I cant see how the hard top and associated hardware wouldn't exaggerate the movement of the boat in these conditions but I suspect deadrise may have more of an impact on what you are feeling.

General rule of thumb is to pull the tabs back in a following sea although I don't recall a time where I have stuffed the bow and I tend to use the tabs aggressively for speed/economy at higher RPM.

In quartering seas, pulling back the down sea tab a bit will tend to cut back on any occasional diving that may happen. (ex seas on port quarter, pull back starboard bow slightly)

In a tight quartering chop try running with tabs pulled back all the way and only a little tab into
the sea. (ex chop on port quarter, port bow down slightly) Throttle back as conditions warrant but
generally in the range of 12-18 knots seems to work well for us depending on conditions.

It takes time to learn a new boat and get comfortable. More so when the boat is in storage
for for half of the year. Also, there are times that conditions will warrant changing course and plans. This is part of boating but it is easy to get destination focused and forget.

For context, we have had the 35 for 6 years and have logged in the area of 13k NM.
When looking to make distance we will run at 2300 RPM & 19.5 knots at most.
We rarely run any faster except to make sure the boat will turn up and cool properly at or near full
RPM on occasion. Otherwise we run around 1250 RPM & 8.5 knots.

We typically leave the steering to the AP unless in inlets, crowded/busy areas, etc. An exception to this
was this fall coming down the ICW in north Fl. Offshore conditions were 12' seas and blowing NE. We were traversing a couple of large bays with breaking chop on the quarter and narrow channels. We were running maybe 14 knots and it took some advance planning to keep the boat on track. It didn't help
that the rudder arms were getting worn and the AP tended to meander a bit anyway...I have since replaced the arms, rudder indicator and associated hardware:)

As I noted, I have considered removing the hard top and framing myself. My thoughts were to remove it all and go with a foldable mast or something similar to be able to take advantage of the reduced bridge clearance. This would have advantages when stored as well. I don't think I would go with a typical light canvas myself. A vinyl material offers better weather protection. I was planning on adding a partial weather helm below at the same time but we
have adjusted to the boat it seems.
tconnelly254
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RCwhite, thanks for your detailed response. It sounds like we basically have the same boat; when you say you run at 12-18 knots in a quartering sea, I'm assuming in that case you are running faster and therefore passing the waves. Are you typically doing the same thing in a pure following sea? Assuming seas are not more than 5' or so?
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rcwhite
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I don't think about it too much, just go by feel mostly but basically you want to get off of a plane and get the stern down/bow up
& match the speed of the conditions for the most part, maybe a little ahead. In a following sea, the boat handles fine at 18-20
most of the time.

It really isn't the wave height but the frequency. 6' seas at 10-12 seconds is pretty quiet, 6' at 6 seconds not so much.
We have been out in a variety of conditions but 3-6 isn't unusual in open water. In the shallow or tidal water where it can
stack up, we try to stick with calmer weather but sometimes things change while you are out.
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