V berth

Albin's "power cruisers"

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jerridsc
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Any tips on how to make a pattern for cutting the big slab of foam bedding I have?
dkirsop
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Make separate patterns for the port and starboard bunks as they differ slightly in length due to the cabinetry. I used brown parcel paper to trace the lower face of the cushion shape and then cut it to shape. I cut a pointer and attached it to a piece of scrap lumber that was equal in height to the foam thickness to mark offsets on the pattern for the upper surface. The pointer was attached to the mount with a fixed offset of about 6" then for each position of the pointer along the bunk I traced the base onto the pattern and noted the offset. This allowed the pattern maker to use the lower pattern to layout the pattern for the upper panel using the offset marks on the lower pattern. Eventually the two patterns are overlayed along the common sides with vertical edges to result in an outboard edge that conforms to the hull. Sorry, I don't have any photographs showing this process but it sounds more complicated than it is. Producing the patterns only took about an hour.
Hull No. 1013, 1971
DesertAlbin736
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Only thing I can add is an electric foam cutter knife like this would help make the actual cutting easier once you have your pattern. Sailrite sells them but they're not cheap.

Sailrite also sells various types and sizes of foam cushion material as well as tools including a shaper and electric foam knife, but I suppose you might find a used cutter on eBay or something. Perhaps there's a wholesale fabric store in your area that caters to the trade & can cut & shape the foam for you?

https://www.sailrite.com/search?keywords=foam
foamcutter.jpg
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La Dolce Vita
1971 Albin 25 #736
Yanmar 3GM30F
Gig Harbor Boatworks Nisqually 8 dinghy
Residence: Peoria, AZ
Homeport: Lake Pleasant, AZ & beyond
WillieC
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The old turkey cutting electric knife works ok as well.

Mr. K has your answer, just take your time. You lose a lot of area by not fitting to the angle of the hull.

Also consider something like Aire-Flow Hypervent below your foam. Helps with condensation.

(The fun begins when you start making covers for your foam. This early stuff is easy. Forget form fitting sheets. You will lose your mind.)
dkirsop
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For what it is worth, get an experienced upholstery shop to fabricate the cushions. They have the tools, the talent and the experience to get the fit right. I have done several boats and this is one job I always have done by professionals. Ask around at marinas to see who other boaters use. I ended up taking my job to a shop that specialized in auto restoration and custom work. Money well spent.
Hull No. 1013, 1971
Ed422
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Sailrite sells a product called duraskrim which is a bit more durable than brown paper, though brown paper can work if you're careful to not rip it while moving around. What my wife did when she made new cushions all around was to make a pattern on the berth itself, then taped it down and at regular intervals (6" I think, maybe closer where the curve was sharper) (using a small square) made notes on how much wider it would be at the 4" height she was making. Then when marking the foam, she'd do the bottom directly with the pattern and the top by lining up the pattern and making marks the distance out where noted. She did a beautiful job. Ours is an Albin 30, but the same method would work on any boat. FWIW, she got a sewing machine from Sailrite so it would be strong enough to make it through the material. Cutting the foam was with an electric meat slicer.
DesertAlbin736
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I agree with dkirsop. Making simple rectangular cushions is one thing, and I have made cockpit bench seat cushions and driver seat cushions (to replace the stock driver seat which was uncomfortable). But the V berth cushions have tight 90 degree inside corners and complex curved & tapered edges on the outboard sides and that is quite another story unless you're already highly skilled and equipped with a good heavy duty walking foot sewing machine. Good upholstery material is expensive & would not want to take a chance on messing up the job. People may look at buying an old boat with raggedy cushions and think, "oh, no big deal, easy fix'. Then get sticker shock when they find out how much labor and materials actually costs to redo & upgrade cushions.
La Dolce Vita
1971 Albin 25 #736
Yanmar 3GM30F
Gig Harbor Boatworks Nisqually 8 dinghy
Residence: Peoria, AZ
Homeport: Lake Pleasant, AZ & beyond
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